John Kane-Berman

John Kane-Berman, a graduate of Wits and Oxford (where he was a Rhodes Scholar), is a former CEO of the IRR. Prior to that he spent ten years in journalism, where he was senior assistant editor of the Financial Mail and South African correspondent for numerous foreign papers. He is the author of several books on South African politics, and has also published his memoirs.
Expropriation without compensation is still very much on the agenda
by John Kane-Berman — last modified Aug 04, 2019 09:24 PM
John Kane-Berman
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Aug 05, 2019

The Land Panel’s acknowledgement that demand for land is not ‘self-evident’ – but that citizens should be ‘encouraged and supported to articulate their land demands’ – confirms that ‘land reform’ is driven by ideology rather than demand.

Water: a greater crisis than unemployment?
by John Kane-Berman — last modified Jul 21, 2019 10:46 PM
John Kane-Berman
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Jul 22, 2019

In water, as elsewhere, failure to maintain or extend infrastructure means the cost of doing so is far beyond the capacity of the impoverished, and profligate, ANC government.

White privilege is at best only half the story
by John Kane-Berman — last modified May 26, 2019 09:37 PM
John Kane-Berman
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May 27, 2019

Scapegoating whites only exonerates the ANC, legitimates policies that perpetuate poverty and exclusion, and creates the impression that the path to success is simply to reverse the privilege.

Ramaphosa's chance and Maimane's crossroads (and snotklap)
by John Kane-Berman — last modified May 19, 2019 09:54 PM
John Kane-Berman
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May 20, 2019

The African National Congress (ANC) has no means of knowing whether the man who ran its recent election campaign, Fikile Mbalula, was wrong in claiming that without Cyril Ramaphosa the party would have garnered not 58% of the vote but 40%.

Still no answers from the right-wing critics
by John Kane-Berman — last modified May 12, 2019 09:18 PM
John Kane-Berman
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May 12, 2019

Apart from ducking the question of how to deal with the practicalities of "radical partition", the question of how to implement political ideas most of the population opposed was ignored.


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